Upskilling – the Hidden Perk of Being a Freelance Vehicle Technician

Vehicle technician trainingThere has been plenty of news on the automotive industry’s skills shortage and the need to recruit new talent, but what about the vehicle technicians who are working right now? As a permanent employee, you may be wondering why your employer hasn’t delivered on their training promises. Time and money are usually the key factors, but with the vehicle technology moving at a such a pace, you can’t afford to be left behind.

As with the evolution of the automotive industry, the world of freelancing has changed too, and no longer a career choice for IT wizards and marketing execs alone. The motor trade no longer spurns the idea of taking on a temporary vehicle technician, and regularly employs technicians on a short-term basis to cover any labour gaps, in fact, the demand is far outstripping the current supply.

A freelance marketing exec from the 1990s will have faced a multitude of upskilling requirements to enable them to adapt to the social media and blogging of the 2000s – if they didn’t, they were probably usurped by a millennial. A vehicle technician faces the same challenges. The automotive industry is fast-paced and changing at a rapid speed, those trained in electric vehicles, for example, are increasingly sought after by garages who have yet to send their technicians on the relevant courses.

Upskilling isn’t just about attending training courses though, working across different garages as a temporary vehicle technician will build a strong cross-section of skills. And, while independent garages and workshops originally bucked the trend in hiring temporary vehicle technicians, leading car manufacturers are now increasingly tapping into the temporary resource as a way to meet periods of high demand. As these manufacturers tend to want to recruit technicians trained in working on their own specific vehicles, there is now scope for temporary vehicle technicians to embark upon intensive manufacturer led training, organised by companies like Autotech Recruit – enabling them to up-skill, and work across an even wider range of vehicles.

Temporary vehicle technician, Matt Dann, who has been trained to work with Volvo through Autotech Recruit’s Manufacturer Led Programme commented: “Being a contract vehicle technician has opened up new doors to me. All of the courses were organised through Autotech Recruit and this has enhanced my employability.” Working with an agency dedicated to the automotive industry, such as Autotech Recruit, a freelance technician can tap into free manufacturer training and a range of discounted courses, from MOT-related training to specialist training in steering and brakes, along with a range of support and advice.

If you would like to find out more about training opportunities available to Autotech Recruit contract vehicle technicians and MOT testers, please contact one of our consultants on 01234 240503.

February 4th, 2019|