MOT Refresher Course For Testers Replaced by Annual Training | Autotech Recruit

Would you like to know more about how the MOT tester refresher course is being replaced by MOT annual training as part of the modernisation of the MOT scheme?

DVSA has received quite a bit of feedback over the information they’ve already published on the GOV.UK website about the new MOT annual training which is due to kick in from 1 April 2016 onwards.

As a result, they’ve updated their ‘Changes to MOT training’ with more detailed information to answer the kinds of questions they’ve been receiving.

Below we reprint an introduction from the article published by DVSA on the GOV.UK website. You can find the full story under the following link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/mot-training.

 

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is changing the way MOT training is carried out as part of its ongoing aim to modernise the MOT scheme.

The changes are aimed at improving overall road and vehicle safety by increasing:

  • professionalism through the introduction of nationally-recognised qualifications
  • choice and flexibility through the introduction of a wider variety of training options

This is in line with the MOT trade increasingly asking for a more varied and modern approach to training to make it easier to learn in line with individual needs and requirements.

What’s Changing

From April 2016, DVSA will replace the currently suspended MOT tester refresher course with MOT annual training and an assessment.

DVSA won’t deliver the new MOT annual training or assessments and testers will no longer need to attend a 5-year refresher course.

Testers will have to complete the new MOT annual training and assessment in order to maintain their testing status.

The new process will follow a continuing professional development (CPD) model with testers required to complete training and pass an assessment every year for the vehicle classes they test.

The CPD model is common across many safety-related professions allowing you to update your skills each year in manageable ‘bite-sized’ chunks.

As an approach, CPD also has a proven track record in improving individual and workplace:

  • skills and standards
  • performance and professionalism
  • confidence, morale and motivation

For training and assessment purposes, we’ve split the vehicle classes into the following groups:

  • class 1 and 2 vehicles
  • class 3, 4, 5 and 7 vehicles

This means, in order to maintain their testing status for each vehicle class they test, all testers will have to:

  • complete a minimum of 16 hours training over a rolling 5-year period
  • complete a minimum of 3 hours training every year
  • pass an annual assessment

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is changing the way MOT training is carried out as part of its ongoing aim to modernise the MOT scheme.

The changes are aimed at improving overall road and vehicle safety by increasing:

  • professionalism through the introduction of nationally-recognised qualifications
  • choice and flexibility through the introduction of a wider variety of training options

This is in line with the MOT trade increasingly asking for a more varied and modern approach to training to make it easier to learn in line with individual needs and requirements.

Read more on GOV.UK.

Don’t forget to keep an MOT training annual record.

February 26th, 2016|